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A symphony of flatulence- Hardly the worst part of incarceration , nor the best.

By Fairfax/Northern Virginia Criminal Defense/DWI lawyer Jon Katz. Pursuing the best outcome for felonies, misdemeanors, drugs, marijuana, sex crimes, prostitution, weapons, assault, and all other alleged crimes.

08 Jan A symphony of flatulence- Hardly the worst part of incarceration , nor the best.

defense lawyer Jon Katz. Defending cases, felonies and misdemeanors. Fighting tirelessly for the best possible results for his clients. http://katzjustice.com

If you want to be an unwilling actor in a Kafka novel, get yourself arrested; deprived of liberty for lengthy time in a police car, in a holding cell, and waiting for a bond review; get cut off from the world around you; and risk losing your job if you cannot get released right away, and find yourself without sufficient funds to hire a lawyer after paying the substantial bonds out there. The whole time, you are entitled to the Constitutional presumption of innocence; but if so, why does such a huge percentage of criminal defendants — even for non-violent criminal charges — languish in jail pending trial, including under statutes presuming no bond pending trial?

Police detention and jailing is a dehumanizing experience. As much as some might suggest that it is an ashram-type experience — other than the loss of liberty — at least in the nations that have more humane incarceration than the United States, in the United States it takes tremendous transcendence to overlook the metal toilets without seats, amenities worthy of a dungeon, and the body odor, flatus (a "symphony of flatulence" as a client described it), and refusal to bathe (by at least some) of inmates packed closely together. Then there it the waiting, the waiting, the waiting, the waiting, the waiting, the waiting, the waiting, the waiting. LIKE A WATER TORTURE.

The boredom, the boredom, the boredom, the boredom. The stench, the stench, the stench, the stench. Being moved from here to there, there to there, and here to nowhere in particular.  

Look at the jailers. Do they have it much better, other than that they get to go home at the end of their shift?

The foregoing provides some support for ending the dehumanization of arrestees and inmates, and to reverse America’s huge rate of incarceration, and people under pretrial supervision, probation and parole. For those who do get caught in such a trap, I offer inspiration for transcending those problems here, here and here.

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