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[CANCELLED] Claude AnShin Thomas, author of “At Hell’s Gate”, comes to Annapolis April 26

Apr 03, 2012 [CANCELLED] Claude AnShin Thomas, author of “At Hell’s Gate”, comes to Annapolis April 26

UPDATEDApril 24, 2012. Word came today that an unexpected incident has led to the cancellation of Claude AnShin Thomas’s April 26 visit to Annapolis. I expect to hear when he will next visit the area. Other upcoming spiritual and harmony gatherings I look forward to in the D.C. general area are Krishna Das in June for the Buddhafest; Wayne Dyer in September at the National Harbor; taijiquan master Ben Lo later this year; and Bhagavan Das in October in Baltimore County. Ongoing are weekly Wednesday meditation gatherings in Bethesda Maryland with Tara Brach and monthly meditation gatherings in D.C. with Sharon Salzberg.

Last September, I blogged again about my teacher Claude AnShin Thomas, who inspires me to remain calm in the eye of the storm. I am delighted to be meeting him for the second time when he returns to the area as follows:

“The Real Costs of War”

Claude AnShin Thomas Offers Contemplation, Talk on Combat-Related Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Book-signing, Thurs. Apr. 26, 7-9 PM at Unitarian Universalist Church of Annapolis

Here is the informational flyer.

Here is more about Claude AnShin Thomas. He became a mendicant Buddhist monk years after killing hundreds of people in Vietnam. I met Brother Claude in 2005 during his speaking tour, and was taken by his dual approach of not denying or suppressing the anger that he still lives with — which for quite some time led him to pickle himself in drugs, alcohol, and sex — but also doing his best to dissipate and reduce the pain and anger. When he is about to get angry, he accepts the feeling, but tries to dissipate it by focusing on his breath and on the sound of a bell, which I suppose helps get him back to concentrating on his breath and calm rather than on anger.

Brother Claude was heavily influenced by Thich Nhat Hanh in his healing process. He was long out of the military at the time, which was sixteen years after the United States military finally pulled out of Vietnam in 1975.

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