MENU

Storytelling lessons from Bill Cosby, Lou Jacobi, and a cup of coffee

Jul 06, 2011 Storytelling lessons from Bill Cosby, Lou Jacobi, and a cup of coffee

A critical part of persuasion is storytelling, including bringing the jury within the circle of the story.

Thanks to Presentation Zen for talking about the storytelling lessons learned from Bill Cosby — including videos of his storytelling — highlighting the importance of being fully connected with the story, and the benefits of drawing from one’s own life experience and realness in storytelling.

One blogger is representative of millions of people, when he said he had not blogged in a long while, having found nothing worth saying. All of us have priceless stories to tell. Certainly we often must mine for those stories, and give them some thought in telling them in an interesting and compelling way.

Sometimes our stories need time to ferment in order to compel, and to persuade when telling stories for persuasion. Some of my favorite stories from my own experiences come from some interesting people — well-known and not — whom I have bumped into on the street, including the following:

Stories about famous people I have bumped into on the street in Washington, D.C., and Manhattan.

– My story about bumping into Lou Jacobi through a storefront window: I saw him one workday afternoon at lunchtime in 1986 through a midtown Manhattan small shop window. He smiled broadly at being recognized. No need to walk in to say hello; the greeting had been made.  

– From my Random Thoughts page: How much to practice as a musician? In the words of a talented amateur jazz pianist whom I first met over thirty years ago, on a commuter train: "What kind of question is it to ask a music great how many hours the musician practices daily? You practice til you’re f’in great… Then you have a cup of coffee… Then you practice some more."  And some more. 

In that vein, how much does one need to practice to be great at writing and storytelling? You practice til you’re f’in great… Then you have a cup of coffee… Then you practice some more. And some more. 

PREVIOUS
NEXT
No Comments

Post A Comment