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Gaining advantage over opponents without angering them

May 28, 2009 Gaining advantage over opponents without angering them

 

On May 25, I wrote about Jan Diepersloot’s Warriors of StillnessThis book further says:

"Both in the conduct of his life and in the methods of his teachings, Master Cai [Song Fang] epitomizes how knowing one’s own center and that of those we come in contact with in push-hands and energy field play can be used to shore people up rather than upsetting them, stabilizing rather than destabilizing them."

Nevertheless, such internal martial arts as t’ai chi can deliver devastating blows, as Diepersloot also writes in Warriors of Stillness:

"The martial art therapy of the wuji-taiji method of awareness has a yin and yang side to it. Its greatest achievement is the yin aspect, the development of awareness and control in the skill of neutralizing and keeping the peace. However, in its yang aspect, the wuji-taiji method of awareness delivers the power to enforce the peace through the development of the power of deadly integral force that can be discharged with a mere intention."

I have previously related the foregoing ideas to the practice of criminal defense as follows:

Some clients think they need a lawyer who will go into the ring growling, baring fangs, and showing fresh blood on the fingernails. Other clients feel uncomfortable seeing their lawyers yuck it up with cops and prosecutors who are trying to get them convicted and locked up. I respond to my clients that the goal is neither to seek to draw blood that does not need to be drawn for the client’s benefit, nor for me to find a new friend for happy hour. Instead, the goal is to harmonize my client’s problem to my client’s best advantage. If this can be done without harming the other side, wonderful. If this can only be done by seriously — and at all time ethically — damaging the other side, so be it. Jon Katz

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